Tag Archives: career mistakes

3 Reasons You Haven’t Been Promoted

So, you’ve been at your company for 2 years and you are eyeing a promotion.  You are first to arrive and the last to leave the office and you consistently hear positive feedback on your performance.  Why haven’t you received a promotion yet?

There are many factors besides performance at play when it comes to getting promoted.

1. Become Your Own Fan

One of the major reasons people get passed over for a promotion is they don’t’ speak up.  Many people make the mistake of minimizing their accomplishments and efforts.  Become your own fan or cheerleader–take credit where credit is due, and people will begin to recognize your achievements.

2. You Didn’t Let Your Boss Know You Want a Promotion

It may sound obvious, but you might be surprised at how few people come out and directly tell their manager that they’re interested in a promotion.  Often employees are content in their current role, so if you don’t tell your boss you are interested in a promotion, he or she may never know.  Ask your manager’s guidance to understand what the promotion would entail and how you can demonstrate you are worthy of that promotion.

3. You Assume Promotions Are Based on Tenure

You may routinely see coworkers getting promoted after they hit a specific work anniversary, but don’t mistake their tenure for being the reason they were promoted.  Most often their promotion is not tied to their years of service, but instead to an increased accountability that results in their promotion.

 

 

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How To Ensure You Have Great References

References are a must have.  We all need them when finalizing a new job or temporary position.  “References are similar to mentors. . Recruiters and those in HR use references as a way to fill in the gaps about a candidate, to learn more about a candidate’s work style,  and to gauge their success in previous roles. As a job seeker and candidate, it is essential to have a list of people who can provide glowing references about who you are as a person and a hard worker.

Step 1: Find your core references

Determine 3-4 individuals that you can use as a professional reference.  These people should be former managers and /or key client contacts.

Step 2: Ask the for the professional reference

Once you have your core references identified, you may not need to ask each person for a reference. Like finding the perfect role, think about the person on your team who would be a perfect fit to write a recommendation or reference for you. Evaluate the referrals needed by your recruiter or HR manager and determine who you feel will give you the best professional reference. Additionally, not all companies ask for the same number of type of professional reference.  Be sure to evaluate each reference request individually and give your professional references advance warning of any call or reference checks.

Step 3: Help them

Often times the people we ask for references are busy folks. Executives and managers can get asked for references all the time and be bogged down with other work. It is helpful to remind them of projects you worked on together, or instances where you collaborated.  The goal is to help provide anecdotes that your power team can use when talking to a recruiter or writing you a letter of recommendation.

Step 5: Say thank you

It’s easy to get caught up in the craziness of job applications, but remaining in touch with your core references and saying thank you to nurture the ongoing relationship are key to your professional growth. Be mindful of the give and take in the relationship, as well.

 

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10 Things To Leave Off Your Resume

 

Your resume is your first impression.  The language and content of your resume can increase or decrease your chances of landing the job.  Filling precious resume space with verbose language or buzzwords can backfire. Here are 10 words to remove from your resume today:

1. Unemployed

The dates of your employment are shown on your resume. Don’t further emphasize you are unemployed.

2. Hardworking

Company already assume you are a hardworking individual, don’t call it out. 

3. Objective

Most resumes are self-explanatory.  There is no need to take up valuable space with an objective.  It is redundant.

4. Synergy

Words like “synergy” are buzzwords and over used.  Try and avoid them in your resume.

5. Reference Available Upon Request

Having “references upon request” at the bottom of your resume is a sign that a candidate is overeager. If a recruiter wants to call to know more about you, they will reach out directly. There is no need to point out the obvious

6. Rock star

The term “rock star” has been over used in the last few years, especially in the technology industry.

7. Dabbled

Using “dabbled” indicates that you were exposed to a skill or technology.  If that is the case and you don’t use the skill or technology in your position(s), leave it off your resume.

8. Expert

Stay away from the word expert, unless you truly are an expert.  If you include it in your resume, be prepared to back it up during the interview

9. Excessive personal information

Avoid including your birthday, family information, visa status, etc. This information doesn’t speak to your qualifications.

10. Hobbies

Content that does not relate to the job and does not address what qualifications can eliminate you as a candidate.  It is safer to leave hobbies off your resume.  Let me company focus on what you do at work, not after work.

 

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What is Your Body Language Saying…At Work?

 

Body language reveals a lot about a person.  Your body language at work….how professional interact conveys a lot to your peers and manager.

So what does your body language say about you?

Body Language #1: Leaning back in your chair

What It Says About You:  It says you are leaving forward into a problem. Don’t lean backwards because it shows that you’re alienating.

 

Body Language #2: Crossing your arms in a meeting

What It Says About You: Crossing your arms shows you are cut off from receiving ideas…you are defensive.  If your body position is open, you are open to receiving new ideas and what people are saying.]

 

Body Language #3: Gesturing with your hands

What It Says About You: Gesturing with open palms shows you are honest and sensitive.

 

Body Language #4: Tapping your pen on the table

What It Says About You: This shows you are impatient or in discomfort

 

Body Language #5: Licking your lips

What It Says About You:  Chewing on your lips or licking your lips shows you are nervous and /or bored

 

Body Language #6: Stretching or yawning.

What It Says About You: Stretching or rubbing you head in meetings signals that you’re bored.

 

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4 Resumes Mistakes That Are Costing You That Dream Job

 

A resume is the most important step in getting a job.  The smallest error can cost you the interview and your dream job.  Your resume paints a picture of your experience, successes and career.  Most hiring managers weigh an applicant’s resume heavily when filling a position.  Every piece of information in the resume should be clear, accurate and well-thought-out.

Below are 4 common resume mistakes job seekers should avoid:

 

  1. Too Many Grammatical Errors

Typos and grammatical errors are costly errors because such mistakes can easily destroy your credibility.  This can be easily avoided by proofreading your resume. Give it to a friend or family member for a fresh set of eyes. It’s not worth missing out on a job opportunity because of an avoidable spelling mistake.

 

  1. Emphasizes Duties Over Accomplishments

A common mistake in many resumes where many job applicants spend most of the space highlighting the job responsibilities instead of focusing on their accomplishments.  Prospective employers want to see specific, quantifiable accomplishments on your resume.   These accomplishment speak to your ability and what you can bring to their team and company.

 

  1. Filled With Jargon or Terminology

Exhibiting your specific skillsets are important, especially when you are seeking a technical or IT job, but too much jargon or too much “tech talk” in your resume can often prevent the company from identifying your accomplishment and viewing your experience.

 

  1. Too Long

It is important to highlight your experience and accomplishments, but if your resume is too long the hiring manager may not finish reading it….a miss important details that relate to their opportunity.  A good rule of thumb is to give enough details about your previous positions, while emphasizing your accomplishment, but leave some more detail you can expand on in an interview.  This will help you peak the hiring managers interest in you and help you empress them during the interview.

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3 Resume Trends For Today’s Job Search

 

The resume strategy you used 10 years ago is not the same strategy used today. In fact, the resume you wrote even just a year ago likely needs to be updated. Here are 3 examples of how resume are changing.

1. Old Strategy: Including an objective
New Strategy: Today, objectives are viewed by most employers as outdated.  Instead of an objective, create a resume headline that helps you target jobs and employers.  This headline will help you brand yourself during your job search.

2. Old Strategy: A resume is just the facts
New Strategy: Today, resumes include details and context.  Successful resumes now include details and quantifiable results.  These details help prospective employers to better understand the value you will bring to their organization prior to an interview.

3. Old Strategy: Follow up the uploaded or emailed resume with a hard copy

New Strategy: You may need a printed resume during the interview process; however the initial focus of applying online and/or submitting your resume to a potential hiring manager or recruiter rarely requires a hard copy. The focus now is on digital presentation online.   Focusing on your online presentation, including resume, can help you stand out.

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Be Careful of These 4 Career Missteps

 

In the workplace, there are small missteps that are easy to recover from and then there are big blunders that can kill your career.  Whether you are just starting out or have been in your career for years, here are four career missteps to avoid:

  1. Being too ambitious

Everyone wants to get ahead, but the successful ones know their limitations and the timing associated with the right career move.  Knowing when to push for a new promotion or career move is important.  Trying to climb the corporate ladder to quickly can result in a poor reputation or worse failure in the new role.  Often the new role is very visible and can greatly diminish your chances of moving up within the organization.

  1. Burning Bridges

The average millennial will change job 6.3 times from age 18-25.  Changing jobs for the right reason can benefit your career, but it depends on how and why you are making the change. While employers are much more willing to accept job hopping from the younger folk, a lot depends on how they do it. For more experience professional, be careful not to ‘job hop’.  Moving jobs too often, even for the right reasons can make landing your dream role move difficult.  When you do decided to leave a role, be candid, pick an exit timeline and stick to it and put in the extra work to ensure a smooth transition for you and your employer.   This will prevent burned bridges that can come back to haunt you in the future.

  1. Getting Friendly With Colleagues

Human nature doesn’t disappear when you start a new job, so it’s understandably that like-minded people tend to gravitate toward each other. Often, workplace bonds can be deep and long lasting. However, getting too close with one group of people and it can hurt your career, particularly if that group falls out of favor or are part of a round of layoffs.  A better strategy is to make friends across the entire organization.   This will help you build your name and reputation within the company.  The more people you know throughout the company, the greater your connections and networking opportunities.

  1. Dismissing Feedback or Criticism

No matter your level within a company, we all have manager and mentors that can help us navigate and improve our job performance. These people can provide you with invaluable advice and feedback, but you must be willing to accept it.  If you never learn to accept feedback or criticism, you’ll kill your career before it begins.

 

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