Tag Archives: resume advice

10 Things To Leave Off Your Resume

 

Your resume is your first impression.  The language and content of your resume can increase or decrease your chances of landing the job.  Filling precious resume space with verbose language or buzzwords can backfire. Here are 10 words to remove from your resume today:

1. Unemployed

The dates of your employment are shown on your resume. Don’t further emphasize you are unemployed.

2. Hardworking

Company already assume you are a hardworking individual, don’t call it out. 

3. Objective

Most resumes are self-explanatory.  There is no need to take up valuable space with an objective.  It is redundant.

4. Synergy

Words like “synergy” are buzzwords and over used.  Try and avoid them in your resume.

5. Reference Available Upon Request

Having “references upon request” at the bottom of your resume is a sign that a candidate is overeager. If a recruiter wants to call to know more about you, they will reach out directly. There is no need to point out the obvious

6. Rock star

The term “rock star” has been over used in the last few years, especially in the technology industry.

7. Dabbled

Using “dabbled” indicates that you were exposed to a skill or technology.  If that is the case and you don’t use the skill or technology in your position(s), leave it off your resume.

8. Expert

Stay away from the word expert, unless you truly are an expert.  If you include it in your resume, be prepared to back it up during the interview

9. Excessive personal information

Avoid including your birthday, family information, visa status, etc. This information doesn’t speak to your qualifications.

10. Hobbies

Content that does not relate to the job and does not address what qualifications can eliminate you as a candidate.  It is safer to leave hobbies off your resume.  Let me company focus on what you do at work, not after work.

 

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4 Resumes Mistakes That Are Costing You That Dream Job

 

A resume is the most important step in getting a job.  The smallest error can cost you the interview and your dream job.  Your resume paints a picture of your experience, successes and career.  Most hiring managers weigh an applicant’s resume heavily when filling a position.  Every piece of information in the resume should be clear, accurate and well-thought-out.

Below are 4 common resume mistakes job seekers should avoid:

 

  1. Too Many Grammatical Errors

Typos and grammatical errors are costly errors because such mistakes can easily destroy your credibility.  This can be easily avoided by proofreading your resume. Give it to a friend or family member for a fresh set of eyes. It’s not worth missing out on a job opportunity because of an avoidable spelling mistake.

 

  1. Emphasizes Duties Over Accomplishments

A common mistake in many resumes where many job applicants spend most of the space highlighting the job responsibilities instead of focusing on their accomplishments.  Prospective employers want to see specific, quantifiable accomplishments on your resume.   These accomplishment speak to your ability and what you can bring to their team and company.

 

  1. Filled With Jargon or Terminology

Exhibiting your specific skillsets are important, especially when you are seeking a technical or IT job, but too much jargon or too much “tech talk” in your resume can often prevent the company from identifying your accomplishment and viewing your experience.

 

  1. Too Long

It is important to highlight your experience and accomplishments, but if your resume is too long the hiring manager may not finish reading it….a miss important details that relate to their opportunity.  A good rule of thumb is to give enough details about your previous positions, while emphasizing your accomplishment, but leave some more detail you can expand on in an interview.  This will help you peak the hiring managers interest in you and help you empress them during the interview.

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3 Resume Trends For Today’s Job Search

 

The resume strategy you used 10 years ago is not the same strategy used today. In fact, the resume you wrote even just a year ago likely needs to be updated. Here are 3 examples of how resume are changing.

1. Old Strategy: Including an objective
New Strategy: Today, objectives are viewed by most employers as outdated.  Instead of an objective, create a resume headline that helps you target jobs and employers.  This headline will help you brand yourself during your job search.

2. Old Strategy: A resume is just the facts
New Strategy: Today, resumes include details and context.  Successful resumes now include details and quantifiable results.  These details help prospective employers to better understand the value you will bring to their organization prior to an interview.

3. Old Strategy: Follow up the uploaded or emailed resume with a hard copy

New Strategy: You may need a printed resume during the interview process; however the initial focus of applying online and/or submitting your resume to a potential hiring manager or recruiter rarely requires a hard copy. The focus now is on digital presentation online.   Focusing on your online presentation, including resume, can help you stand out.

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The Best Skills To Have on Your Resume

Popular resume templates and HR pros prompt job seekers to include a list of strategic skills on their resume. You skills section of your resume is a opportunity to show off a bit.

Before grabbing your laptop to edit, follow these five steps to make your resume really shine:

  1. Tailor your list Do some research on job you are targeting.  If you are applying to work as a Java developer, make sure you include Java skills listed as part of your strategic skills.
  2. Emphasize tech skills Being technical is good, but these days you need to distinguish yourself.  So, be specific with your technical skills and include specific tools when appropriate.
  3. Showcase your social media expertise While a large number of Instagram followers is impressive to buddies, it’s not necessarily a skill. However, if you’ve successfully used social media to create a brand or to share your expertise, be sure to include this experience. Make sure to quantify your impact with relevant data.
  4. Know the lingo Every industry has its own insider language and concepts. Show your command of this in the resume and cover letter.  Continue to do your research, so you are aware of the trends in your industry.  Talk to mentors, professors and other professionals to learn what everyone in the industry talks about, so that you can align your skill set with the industry’s standards

 

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Use Your Network and Skills to Land A Job

 

Are you asking “How do I get a job”?  If so, remember those referrals are so valued by companies that these companies pay referrals. These incentives encourage staff to bring in talented candidates to interview for open roles.

  1. Identify How You Stand Out

When you first start your job search, take some time to evaluate your experience.  Start by looking at your resume to determine what skills and experience you have that make you unique. Does your resume show your special skills, experience, and talents?

There are probably some changes you can make to better reflect your experiences. Make sure your resume includes quantifiable achievements.  When possible relate your successes to cost savings and business improvements.  Make a new list of your achievements, citing specific examples and stories that showcase how great you are at what you do. These will be an important tool throughout your job search.

2. Network
Use the research you did on social media to strategically make new connections with professionals in your industry. Attending networking events related to your dream job or industry is a great way to make connections regarding open positions.  Use social media to help find targeted events in your area.

Leverage your friends and family to get the word out about your job search. Everyone knows someone and getting the word out you are looking for a new job is important.  Remember that companies pay referral fees, so there is a personal benefit for your friends and network.

Once you establish that you’ve paid attention to their interests, you shouldn’t ask for a job right away. Instead, ask to learn more about what they do in their role, or what they like about working for their company. Put some effort into cultivating a mutually beneficial relationship. If you take the extra time, many people will be happy to help you apply for the role.

3. Ace your interview.

Landing an interview is the first hurdle in your job search, but then recruiters often use challenging interviews to find – and hire – the best talent.

Even if you’re faced with challenging or odd interview questions, use the accomplishment stories you developed earlier to engage the hiring manager. Your answers should reveal how you can solve problems, and why you’re the best person for the job.

4. Remember to Follow Up

It may seem old school in this age of technology, but a thank you note can go a long way. The note can be hand written or via email.

Thank your interviewers individually for the time they spent meeting you, and reference something specific you enjoyed learning from them during your conversation. This is the last key piece of the puzzle is to show your interest for the position and to ask for the job.

 

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